Chem. Asian J.

Chem. Asian J.

Theoretical Study on Reaction Mechanisms of Dinitrogen Activation and Coupling by Carbene-Stabilized Borylenes in Comparison with Intramolecular C-H Bond Activation

Dinitrogen (N2) activation is particularly challenging due to the significantly strong N≡N bond, let alone the catenation of two N2 molecules. Recent experimental study shows that cyclic (alkyl)(amino)carbene (CAAC)-stabilized borylenes are able to tackle N2 activation and coupling below room temperature. Here we carry out density functional theory calculations to explore the corresponding reaction mechanisms. The results indicate that the reaction barrier for the dinitrogen activation by the first borylene is slightly higher than that by the second borylene.

Predicting Dinitrogen Coupling with a Series of Small Molecules Catalyzed by a Pincer Complex

Due to consumption of more than 2% of the world's annual energy supply by Haber–Bosch process and the strongest triple bond (N≡N) in nature, directly coupling N 2 with small molecules is particularly important and challenging, let alone in a catalytic fashion. Here we first demonstrate that a NNN-type pincer phosphorus complex could act as a catalyst to couple dinitrogen with a series of small molecules including carbon dioxide, formaldehyde, N-ethylidenemethylamine, and acetonitrile in the presence of diborane(4) under a mild condition by theoretical calculations.

Predicting Dinitrogen Activation via Transition Metal Involved [4 + 2] Cycloaddition Reaction

As the strongest triple bond in nature, the N≡N triple bond activation has always been a challenging project in chemistry. On the other hand, since the award of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1950, Diels‐Alder reaction has served as a powerful and widely applied tool in the synthesis of natural products and new materials. However, the application of Diels‐Alder reaction to dinitrogen activation remains less developed.

Adaptive σ‐Aromaticity in an Unsaturated Three-Membered Ring

Based on Hückel’s and Baird’s rules, species are aromatic either in the lowest singlet state (S0) or the lowest triplet state (T1) only. Thus, species with adaptive aromaticity (with aromaticity in both the S0 and T1 states) is particularly rare. On the other hand, σ-aromaticity in the T1 state has been underdeveloped, let alone adaptive σ-aromaticity. Herein, via various aromaticity indices including NICS, ACID and EDDB, we demonstrate adaptive s-aromaticity in an unsaturated three-membered ring, which is a traditional area dominated by π-aromaticity.

Achieving Adaptive Aromaticity in Cyclo[10]carbon by Screening Cyclo[n]carbon (n = 8‐24)

Discovery of species with adaptive aromaticity (being aromatic in both the lowest singlet and triplet states) is particularly challenging as cyclic species are generally aromatic either in the ground state or in the excited state only according to Hückel’s and Baird’s rules.

Aromaticity‐promoted CO2 Capture by P/N‐Based Frustrated Lewis Pairs: A Theoretical Study

Carbon dioxide (CO2, a common combustion pollutant) releasing continuously into the atmosphere is primarily responsible for the rising atmospheric temperature. Therefore, CO2 sequestration has been an indispensable area of research for the past several decades. On the other hand, the concept of aromaticity is often employed in designing chemical reactions and metal‐free frustrated Lewis pairs (FLPs) have proved ideal reagents to achieve CO2 reduction. However, considering FLP and aromaticity together is less developed in CO2 capture.

Predicting an Antiaromatic Benzene Ring in the Ground State Caused by Hyperconjugation

Benzene, the prototype of aromatics, has six equivalent C‐C bonds (1.397 Å), which are intermediate between a C‐C double bond and a C‐C single bond. For over 80 years, chemists have spent much effort on freezing a localized structure to obtain a distorted bond‐length alternating benzene ring in the ground state, leading to various localized trisannelated benzene rings. However, most of the central benzene rings are still aromatic or nonaromatic. Here we report an antiaromatic benzene ring caused by hyperconjugation.

Reaction Mechanisms on Unusual 1,2‐Migrations of N‐Heterocyclic Carbene‐Ligated Transition Metal Complexes

Unusual 1,2‐migration reactions of N‐heterocyclic carbene (NHC) on transition metals were investigated using density functional theory calculations. Our results reveal that the electronic properties, ring strain of the four‐membered ring, and aromaticity of NHC play crucial roles in the thermodynamics of such a 1,2‐migration.

Probing Reaction Mechanism of [1,5]‐Migration in Pyrrolium and Pyrrole Derivatives: Activation of a Stronger Bond in Electropositive Groups Becomes Easier

The [1,5]‐migration reaction has attracted considerable attention from experimentalists and theoreticians for decades. Although it has been extensively investigated in various systems, studies on pyrrolium derivatives are underdeveloped. Herein, a theoretical study on the reaction mechanism of [1,5]‐migration in both pyrrolium and pyrrole derivatives is presented.

Aromaticity‐promoted C−F Bond Activation in Rhodium Complex: A Facile Tautomerization

Fluorine is the most electronegative element in the periodic table. Thus, activation of the carbon–fluorine (C−F) bond, the strongest single bond to carbon, has attracted considerable interest from both experimentalists and theoreticians. In comparison with numerous approaches to activate C−F bonds, the aromaticity‐promoted method is less developed. Herein, we demonstrate that the C−F bond activation could be achieved by a facile tautomerization, benefitting from aromaticity, which can stabilize both the transition states and products.

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